South Pacific nations have the highest prevalence of diabetes in the world – so high that the United Nations reports that diabetes and other non-communicable diseases are one of the greatest threats to the regions development.

The 10,000 Toes campaign is committed to turning the tide of diabetes to save lives and limbs. This project will:

  1. Equip every Pacific village with the skills and tools to conduct community health assessments for the early detection of diabetes (and other, related chronic diseases)
  2. Train and resource lifestyle coaches to implement programs to prevent, arrest and reverse Type 2 diabetes in every village
  3. Improve the capacity of health professionals working in health systems across the South Pacific to manage diabetes

 

Share this video to inspire others to help stamp out Type 2 diabetes in the South Pacific.

The 10,000 Toes campaign is a partnership between ADRA Australia & the South Pacific Division of the Seventh-day Adventist church.

Progress

21%

$210,000 raised

112 donors

$1,000,000 goal

This project is being launched in 2018 with the aim of reaching 10,000 people affected or at risk of Type II Diabetes across the South Pacific region.

Stories

Telita* knew something was wrong with her mother – she was constantly sick and lacked the energy she once had. As a result, Telita found her help was increasingly needed to keep her family going. Then, her mother developed grizzly sores on her leg and was told she would need it removed. It would also mean she’d lose her job. Telita’s mother has Type II diabetes – a disease that causes thousands of people in the Pacific to lose their limbs and their lives.  Sadly, diabetes has not only taken her mother’s leg and employment, but Telita’s future as well. In order to help her mother and her family survive Telita has dropped out of school.

Your support today will not only help stamp out diabetes, but will ensure other children like Telita don’t have their futures taken by the impact of Type II Diabetes.

*Name changed to protect privacy